Difference between revisions of "Open-ended questions are common in real life"

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(Created page with "A frequent advice in the spaced repetition community is to make each card small, with a definite answer. Complicated responses like lists and sets are disco...")
 
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A frequent advice in the [[spaced repetition]] community is to make each card [[small card|small]], with a definite answer. Complicated responses like lists and sets are discouraged. But in real life, it is quite common to receive prompts that have complicated answers (e.g. "can you teach me about the law of cosines?")
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A frequent advice in the [[spaced repetition]] community is to make each card [[small card|small]], with a definite answer. Complicated responses like lists and sets are discouraged. But in real life, it is quite common to receive prompts that have complicated answers (e.g. "can you teach me about the law of cosines?"). This means that if one's [[spaced repetition practice]] only contains small cards that contain atomic info, one does not get any regular practice [[integration card|integrating]] knowledge/applying it.
  
 
I think people should spend more time thinking about how to correctly Ankify knowledge like this.
 
I think people should spend more time thinking about how to correctly Ankify knowledge like this.
 
==See also==
 
 
* [[Integration card]]
 
  
 
[[Category:Spaced repetition]]
 
[[Category:Spaced repetition]]

Revision as of 18:03, 23 November 2020

A frequent advice in the spaced repetition community is to make each card small, with a definite answer. Complicated responses like lists and sets are discouraged. But in real life, it is quite common to receive prompts that have complicated answers (e.g. "can you teach me about the law of cosines?"). This means that if one's spaced repetition practice only contains small cards that contain atomic info, one does not get any regular practice integrating knowledge/applying it.

I think people should spend more time thinking about how to correctly Ankify knowledge like this.